Is Attitude the Name of Your Game?

Image

Is Attitude the Name of your Game?

A major consequence of the Digital Revolution is the growing divide between those stuck in an analogue mindset, and those who have embraced digital wholeheartedly; the Digital Generation, regardless of chronological ageing. Our Digital Age marks a shift in human history, away from the Industrial Revolution, traditional industry, to an economy based on information, technology, and knowledge.

Our knowledge-based society is completely surrounded by a digitized high-tech global economy spanning its influence over consumer and service sectors, to create function in an efficient, effective, and convenient manner. Convenience though, has developed demand for a higher performance culture, the precedent of which has never been seen before. High performance culture demands now technology. Now technology is part of a now society, a growing society; and keeping up, necessarily part of the evolution.

Cultural evolution of mankind, as argued by Kantor (1933), is dependent on cultural unity. Universal cultural unity depends on: social organization, technology, art, religion, law, customs and manners, language, and intellectual equipment for civility. Evolution of civilization therefore requires certain behavioural steps which are examined with the theory of unilinear cultural evolution. Civilized behavioural elements are widely distributed over large civilizational areas and dispersion is offered through two opposing theoretical perspectives. Diffusion theory postulates that there are ultimate differences in mental capacity between different people, shaping societal behaviour, whereas the convergenists postulate a psychic unity, or collective mind controlling social normative behaviour.

Perhaps the assumption that mentality is the same globally, also assumes that all people are capable of inventing things, equally. Global civilization therefore is believed to be the process of equal distribution via original dispersion, original development, or interrelationships globally. Global acknowledgement of the nature and development of groups for civilization, and the probability that a tremendously large number of factors cooperate in the production of a particular kind of civilization outcome, must also be considered.

Does Kantor’s theory of cultural unity and evolution of civilization apply to global digitization?

Although historically civilization’s rise and decline, with superiorities and inferiorities are acknowledged through opposing theories concerning the relation of humans and civilization or society. According to one theory, mind is the all-powerful factor in human affairs; and is a directive agent for all that happens, such as the creator or god affect. Reasoning, therefore that people create the elements in civilization; and civilization is therefore considered dependent upon the people. While the opposing traditional perspective that social destiny influences human affairs generally; the individual, no matter who he or she is, is carried by a stream which no man can control or stop, such is indicative of “Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans (Lennon, 1984)” (Kantor,1933).

Arguably, global digitization assumes both theoretical postulations: firstly, digitization has been created by man; and secondly, as a social intervention digitization of society changed social structure and consequent social destiny; giving rise to a cultural evolution that is carrying a whole global civilization on a stream of unilinear cultural evolution.

What does this mean for those who fail to keep up with digitization? Extinction?

What does this mean for entire groups, such as Companies, Organizations, and Corporations; who fail to keep up?

And is the possibility of the unthinkable, mass extinction, possible?

Consider Company’s, Organization’s, or Corporation’s that have specific needs apparent to those business goals, vision, and mission it conducts. Specific to her people, place, and situation, the business needs demand and shape the required behaviour and consequent culture required for business efficiency. A business’ normed culture that fits with other designates is good business. Good business partners adapt, change and flex to the expectations of others; because failure to do so means loss of business.

Surely this creates the argument for digitization, in itself; business has to fit the needs of other businesses; in order to-do-business. Otherwise the business can be considered outlier, and as such shapes a society different from the larger global digitized civilization.

While civilizations are considered dependent on people; Corporations in their entire similarity are also dependent on people. Therefore reasoning that people are important elements of civilization, and civilization is dependent on people; we must also reason that people are important elements of Corporations.

While Kantor argues that people are important elements, and the theoretical argument that the mind is the all-powerful factor in human affairs; and that the mind is a directive agent for all that happens; and the traditional perspective that people create the elements of civilisation, and social destiny influences people matters; then the question poses itself, are the people the creators of the very life stream which no man can stop or control?

Global digitization therefore, we argue assumes both theoretical postulations: firstly, digitization has been created by man; and secondly, as a social intervention digitization has changed civilizations social structure, giving rise to a cultural evolution of unilinear global mass proportions assuming the creator or godly effect.

Can the consequences of such godly effects assumedly mean control of the monopolisation of digitization? He who holds the reins, holds the game? And he who holds the game holds the future of mankind in the palm of his hand?

Let’s examine the game as an analogy of the popular board game Monopoly. Everyone knows the Monopoly game ends when players can no longer afford to make payments to the person in possession of all the assets, and all the money [the monopoliser]. However, let’s postulate for a moment that the monopoliser still wants to play. How can the game continue, if only one person has all the wealth?

Would the monopoliser be in the position of changing the rules of the game? Or would that simply be to the monopolisers’ advantage?

Would the bankrupted players be in the position of changing the rules of the game? After all the game can’t continue without them, can it?

How might the game continue?

Of course theoretically, the bankrupted players have more bargaining power than initially realised. One solution is the bankrupted players can pool financial resources; and play one-on-one. Secondly, the game continues using a different economy. Thirdly bankrupted players collaborate using the understanding of the monopolisers’ motivations as a bargaining tool.

In the real world, it might seem obvious that the rise of this new power position is all about the explosion in technology; as well as the ever more essential role digital plays in consumers’ lives. But organizational experts and research indicate growing tensions in the C-suite and board room are also driving the trend upward for solutions.

For fast-growing companies, the Chief Digital Officer [CDO] is emerging as the new “it” position, with Chief Marketing Officers [CMOs] and Chief Intelligence Officers [CIOs] clash more frequently about questions of turf, innovation, and accountability. Is the CDO therefore, the game changer of the Corporate digital revolution? Who can keep their organization changing with change; in fluid motion?

Imagine then what it might be worth to a company to find a CDO who can not only re-write the rules of the game, but can develop others?

Imagine a CDO who can grow business, strengthen Brands, re-invent the market; all while tying their shoelaces [pun]; predict trends with precision accuracy, nurture people, and creating strategy to move an entire organization toward record year, after year in a 360 turn-around of consumer experience; giving the market what it wants before it even knows itself.

Does this sound too good to be true? Leveraging not only digital function, but digital behavioural competency as a means of cutting edge excellence; the CDO who can engage, shape and mould her workforce from strategy to infrastructure aligning the right behavioural competency’s and capability will change the world, right?

But how many companies want to grow exponentially overnight? And how many companies have the capacity to grow exponentially overnight?

Knowledge to grow a company exponentially overnight though, must require more capability then merely the merging of CMO and CIO roles; surely? And yet the career path of a CDO is fast-tracking the CEO role in traditional take-over style. But the style of the three Fs – fluidity, flexibility and free thinking requires stamina, politics, business knowledge, and exemplary people skills, wouldn’t you think? Not simply marketing techno-babble!

But isn’t management, simply management? And how does a fantastic CEO handle pressure?

Recently released seven year research indicates the number one coping competency that delineates the CDO from the CEO role is attitude. Attitude will make or break any organization, but an attitude that stays flexible even in the light of the darkest hour is gold.

As a commodity and an economy, would it be permissible to acknowledge the new game currency keeping our bankrupted players in the Monopoly game; be attitude? And would it be permissible to acknowledge that attitude is the very quality that delineates Kantor’s theoretical divide; between mind being the all-powerful factor in human affairs, and being a directive agent for all that happens? Consequently reasoning that attitude is the fundamental element of civilization, and corporation that carries all humans on the stream which no man can control or stop, Life.

Therefore common sense must prevail that a cross-functional attitudinal intervention that straddles both analogue and digital worlds and leads corporations out of the doldrums of past endeavours not only creates a bridge across uncertainty that appears nothing short of a miracle of mass proportions, but is the new economical currency that keeps players in the game.

Ms Kylie Prince is a D.i.g.i.t.a.l. expert and Senior Consultant with the Eastern Consulting Group, Melbourne, Australia. ECG is an independent consultancy, Building Business with People! Kylie specialises in Dynamic Digital People Solutions. You can connect with Kylie by email kylieprince.ecg@gmail.com or mobile +61 4 3248 5427 or on LinkedIn Social Media site..

Advertisements

The Digital Strategy

The Digital Strategy

The digital strategy cannot begin and end in marketing, because the digital organization is much more than simply go-to-market.

The advantage of faster, deeper research is obvious, and companies have already begun analysing social data for fraud and intellectual property infringement. Now, consider how the use of advanced analytics could offer legal teams new insights to create legal strategy. By combining internal data with external data sources [market data, economic factors, and company profiles]; legal teams can get a view of contributing factors in previous litigation that better inform current strategies. Other analytical techniques can offer legal team’s predictive insight – the ability to identify risk areas and take action before issues arise. Because of these transforming capabilities, we see big data as the strongest business case in Digital Legal Strategy.

Human Resources

Human resources are the key to the organization’s digital success. People engage in social, people are mobile, people want the flexibility of cloud and people generate the terabytes of unstructured data that stress our traditional analytics systems. Every moment of truth in a digital customer experience involves people. To execute on a digital strategy, you need to digital organization and culture, and HR is key in transforming the organization. HR has explosive potential to bring digital capabilities in house and drive business improvements – far beyond using LinkedIn for recruiting. If HR applies and masters game and crowd mechanics for organizational performance; then HR and not marketing, will become the organizations primary digital innovators.

Indeed game and crowd mechanics can leverage an organizations market position to maximum engagement. For an ASX corporation, this means the organization can leverage a multiple motivation system that simply goes beyond earning money by scaling and improving the performance, but the experience used to increase shareholder value. This type of crowd mechanics platform defines the incentive and engagement at group and individual levels to create and bridge a previously one-dimensional but also the multi-dimensioned crowd-sourced motivational system.

Improving Employee Experience Makes a Better Customer Experience

Digital remakes employee-organize connectedness in the same way that it revolutionizing customer-organize relationships. Just as we see in consumer scenarios, digital enables more collaborative and comprehensive employee engagement, which in turn drives higher levels of employee performance. If social and mobile are the best ways to reach customers, logically, they’re also the best way to reach employees. Making social networking and collaboration available internally allows all employees to learn from one another and collectively problem solve.

Just as game and crowd mechanics can be used to drive customer engagement, they can also be used to boost employee performance and loyalty. Employees aren’t simply interested in earning a pay check. Humans engage, participate and are loyal because of deeper motivation: because it’s interesting, because it’s engaging, because it’s the right thing to do, and because they want to contribute.

Traditional Management led to problems;

Siloing organizations;

Management hierarchies;

Annual or quarterly reviews;

Clock-in / clock-out or mandated working hours; and

Financial incentives [carrots and sticks].

We offer Real World leverage from real world crowd-, game-, and analytics-driven approaches that move people forward quickly;

Outcome-based performance measurement;

Continuous and real-time feedback;

Social collaboration;

Real-time coaching and mentoring;

Engagement using crowd mechanics; and

Performance via multi-motivational game mechanics.

As HR learns and applies the multiple motivational approaches of gamification, tapping into people’s desire for status, achievement and rewards to drive organize performance, HR will become the go-to gurus for behavioural insight and game mechanics.

Mining Big Data for Talent and Expertise

The new digital organize helps you find out more about the people who work for you, or who want to work for you. Where is expertise hidden in your organization? Employees may have a deep interest or expertise in areas that are not evident on the CV. The digital organize lets you see who knows what and helps you to take advantage of talents you may not realize you have on board [the mailroom worker who is in film school and could help you with video production; the salesperson who does voiceovers for commercials; the person who answers all the questions about SharePoint on the message boards, etc]. You can then bridge the gap between the subject matter experts and the teams who need their expertise across the organization.

Ms Kylie Prince is a Corporate Psychologist who specialises in Digital Strategy, Brand Leadership, and Impression Management. Kylie can be contacted on leadership.psychologist@gmail.com or +61 4 3248 5427.

 

 

How HR is Transformed

How HR is transformed. The four pillars of digital transformation can drive change for each important area in HR. This scorecard is more detailed than those for other functional areas because HR is of prime importance in driving digital transformation across the organization.

Digital helps HR to become proactive instead of reactive. For instance, social listening and analytics can help you track employee satisfaction and intervene when problems are still small.

 Digital also helps identify under appreciated resources. In the past, leaders and extroverts got the attention. It’s important to nurture them but also to identify the quite achievers whose knowledge skills and abilities may go unsung.

 

HR Functions

Social

Mobile

Cloud

Big Data

Recruiting

HR has rapidly adopted social sites for recruiting;

LinkedIn offers enterprise recruiting tools;

Involved the entire organization in recruiting; and

Social gives you connectivity to a vast network of the best recruits.

Mobile allows employees to capture business card/ CV information via mobile devices wherever they may be [conferences, network events, etc] and submit the contact information directly to HR to initiate recruiting.

HR can streamline the recruiting process with cloud-based collection of contact information and employment applications. Cloud-based solutions enable seamless collaboration with other departments and access to information throughout recruiting and interview process.

Big Data helps HR identify potential recruits by analysing information from social sites, blogs, web sites, white papers and presentations posted online to help find individuals with the necessary skill set. Big Data analytics can help build more reliable, predictive profiles for hiring.

Onboarding

Social tools help new employees find SMEs within the company quickly and easily, rather than relying on tribal knowledge to find the right contacts.

Employees can submit new hire documenta6tion via mobile [photo of driver’s licence and social security card, for example] and track the status from anywhere, at any time.

Cloud technology lets HR streamline the new hire process with cloud based, gamified applications to sign up for benefits, direct deposit, and so on.

 

Performance

There is huge potential in leveraging social and game mechanics to drive employee performance.

Mobile apps allow employees to track their performance and received real-time feedback anytime, from anywhere.

Social and gamified applications run from the cloud, enabling remote access, and dr4iving social influence.

Big data allows performance systems to process unstructured data to identify and reward quiet achievers.

Development

Social capabilities let employee’s self-organize to mentor and be mentored. Social also lets employees ‘follow’ the SMEs and influencers to learn from and emulate. High achievers are identified and recognized so others can emulate their behaviour.

Employee can receive training via mobile devices from anywhere at any time.

Training is delivered on-demand in a gamified environment in multi formats suited to each employee’s learning style [video, text, experiential, etc]

Development mentors are identified through analysis of unstructured data like email and documents based on subject matter expertise as well as likes, interests, etc.

Attrition

Social listening and sentiment analysis help gauge morale and employee satisfaction.

[I wish there were a mobile app for expressing frustration on projects that could later be used to identify process improvements].

 

Process unstructured social data to identify dissatisfied employees who might be flight risk.

Curate Company Knowledge

Information is readily available throughout the organization. Employees can collaborate and provide input on documents, projects, policies, etc.

Company systems and information is accessible via mobile for real-time access and collaboration.

Cloud based document repositories make searching for, collaborating on, and updating information in real-time seamless.

Big data lets employees find information they didn’t know existed by identifying and recommending related documents.

Organizational Change

Organizational change is driven socially by influencers in the company, rather than being handed down from management. Social listening lets management track acceptance [or resistance] of organizational change.

Mobile app0s bring on-the-go [road] employees into the social conversation to support and influence organizational change.

Cloud becomes an enabler of social and mobile applications to speed adoption of organizational change.

Natural language processing, powered, by bidg data analyses sentiment about organizational change across multiple sources [social, email, etc].

 

Transforming HR

How HR is transformed. The four pillars of digital transformation can drive change for each important area in HR. This scorecard is more detailed than those for other functional areas because HR is of prime importance in driving digital transformation across the organization.

Digital helps HR to become proactive instead of reactive. For instance, social listening and analytics can help you track employee satisfaction and intervene when problems are still small.

Digital also helps identify under appreciated resources. In the past, leaders and extroverts got the attention. It’s important to nurture them but also to identify the quite achievers whose knowledge skills and abilities may go unsung.

 

HR Functions Social Mobile Cloud Big Data
Recruiting HR has rapidly adopted social sites for recruiting;LinkedIn offers enterprise recruiting tools;

Involved the entire organization in recruiting; and

Social gives you connectivity to a vast network of the best recruits.

Mobile allows employees to capture business card/ CV information via mobile devices wherever they may be [conferences, network events, etc] and submit the contact information directly to HR to initiate recruiting. HR can streamline the recruiting process with cloud-based collection of contact information and employment applications. Cloud-based solutions enable seamless collaboration with other departments and access to information throughout recruiting and interview process. Big Data helps HR identify potential recruits by analyzing information from social sites, blogs, web sites, white papers and presentations posted online to help find individuals with the necessary skill set. Big Data analytics can help build more reliable, predictive profiles for hiring.
On-boarding Social tools help new employees find SMEs within the company quickly and easily, rather than relying on tribal knowledge to find the right contacts. Employees can submit new hire documentation via mobile [photo of driver’s licence and social security card, for example] and track the status from anywhere, at any time. Cloud technology lets HR streamline the new hire process with cloud based, gamified applications to sign up for benefits, direct deposit, and so on.
Performance There is huge potential in leveraging social and game mechanics to drive employee performance. Mobile apps allow employees to track their performance and received real-time feedback anytime, from anywhere. Social and gamified applications run from the cloud, enabling remote access, and driving social influence. Big data allows performance systems to process unstructured data to identify and reward quiet achievers.
Development Social capabilities let employee’s self-organize to mentor and be mentored. Social also lets employees ‘follow’ the SMEs and influences to learn from and emulate. High achievers are identified and recognized so others can emulate their behavior. Employee can receive training via mobile devices from anywhere at any time. Training is delivered on-demand in a gamified environment in multi formats suited to each employee’s learning style [video, text, experiential, etc] Development mentors are identified through analysis of unstructured data like email and documents based on subject matter expertise as well as likes, interests, etc.
Attrition Social listening and sentiment analysis help gauge morale and employee satisfaction. [I wish there were a mobile app for expressing frustration on projects that could later be used to identify process improvements]. Process unstructured social data to identify dissatisfied employees who might be flight risk.
Curate Company Knowledge Information is readily available throughout the organization. Employees can collaborate and provide input on documents, projects, policies, etc. Company systems and information is accessible via mobile for real-time access and collaboration. Cloud based document repositories make searching for, collaborating on, and updating information in real-time seamless. Big data lets employees find information they didn’t know existed by identifying and recommending related documents.
Organizational Change Organizational change is driven socially by influences in the company, rather than being handed down from management. Social listening lets management track acceptance [or resistance] of organizational change. Mobile apps bring on-the-go [road] employees into the social conversation to support and influence organizational change. Cloud becomes an enabler of social and mobile applications to speed adoption of organizational change. Natural language processing, powered, by big data analyses sentiment about organizational change across multiple sources [social, email, etc].

Ms Kylie Prince is a Corporate Psychologist who specializes in Digitization, Brand Leadership & Impression Management. Kylie can be contacted on leadership.psychologist@gmail.com or +61 4 3248 5427.

Digitization

Image

How are you coping?

Need a quick fix? A band-aide solution? Shh I won’t tell anyone..

Did you know that the amount of structured and unstructured, internal and external data coursing through the veins of your organization is voluminous and increasing exponentially?

Your data today comes from disparate digital sources that include customer interactions across channels such as call enters, telematics devices, social media, agent conversations, smart phones, emails, faxes, police reports, day-to-day business activities, and others. Gartner’s 2011 Top 10 list of IT Infrastructure and Operations Trends predict an 800% growth in data over the next five years. Most Organizations only process about 10-15% of the available data; almost all of it in structured form. While managing this overwhelming data flow can be challenging, insurers can reap very real benefits like increased productivity, improved competitive advantage and enhanced customer experience by capturing, storing, aggregating, and eventually analysing the data.

 Big value does not simply come from managing big data, but rather, from harnessing the actionable insights. Most Organizations can glean objective-driven business value every day simply by applying science to their data and deriving insights that will maintain a competitive advantage and stay ahead of the curve in this information age.

 Based on the evolution of digital and how it impacts every facet of an organization, we needed to develop a comprehensive digital strategy for our digital practice. Our holistic practice framework guides companies through the digital universe enabling our maximising digital opportunities in a co-ordinated, integrated approach. Organizations cannot relate to customers in digital channels through traditional corporate silos; it is impossible. Digital channels are too transparent and customers will not tolerate uncoordinated, uniformed touches from our various internal departments; even when they get superior results.

 Firstly, our digital strategy must align our organizations larger business objectives; and to be truly comprehensive, the strategy must reinforce our enterprise’s short-and long-term goals, as well as the mission of each business unit; and

Secondly, holistic digital strategy breaks down information and organizational silos to ensure all functions including legal, human resources, and finance incorporate the digital strategy as part of their responsibility; and an instrumental means to achieving department and enterprise-wide objectives.

 A Framework to Leverage and Harmonize Digital Efforts Across the Enterprise

 

 

OUTCOMES

 

Web presence

Personalization context

Customer behaviour

Social influencers

Social leads

Individualization insight

Sentiment trends

Market research

Loyalty/advocacy drivers

Customer issues

Service request trends

Sentiment trends

Service channel trends

Customers preferences

Cross- up – sell opportunity

Attrition insight

Propensity to buy

Social leads

Customer advocates

Customer needs analysis

Crowd-sourced ideas

Product/service feedback

Competitive intelligence

 

 

INSIGHT

 

Social business

SEO

SEM

Augmented reality

Campaign microsites

Newsletters

Chat

Email

Branded forums

Automated agents

Contact forms

Support community

Online shopping

Ecommerce

Recommendations

Chat

Contact forms

 

Product communities

Idea exchange

 

Social SEO [SMO]

Facebook page

Twitter handle

Polls, rating and reviews

YouTube Channel

Social listening

Customer community

Facebook page

Twitter handle

Monitor forums

Peer-to-peer support

Video help content

Social listening

Social customer lifecycle

Social prospecting

Social lead qualification

Social commerce

Social listening

Social networking

Rating and reviews

Idea communities/

Crowd sourcing

Social listening

Ideation tools

Social customer councils

Web 2.0 enabled teams

Mobile location

Mobile search

Mobile advertising

Sms campaigns

Mobile website

Mobile promotions

Augmented reality

games

Mobile surveys

Payment alerts

Call center interactions

Mobile self-service Apps

SMS messaging

Location-specific recommendations

Mobile search

Mobile shopping / QR codes

Mobile commerce

Mobile payments

Ratings and reviews

Idea generation App

Mobile ideation websites

Point of sale ideation

 

Marketing and Communications

Customer Service

Sales

Research & Development

 

To deal with the digital transformation, an enterprise must create a comprehensive digital strategy. The digital strategy cannot begin and end in marketing, because the digital enterprise is much more than go-to-market.

All business units must understand how to apply digital capabilities: HR, sales, legal, finance and how to recognize and assess how digital affects their operations. The effectiveness of digital strategy should be evaluated based upon how it impacts all business units.

An effective digital strategy meshes with company culture, building employee affiliation with the enterprise and rewarding and recognizing employee achievements and expertise.

 Ms Kylie Prince is a Corporate Psychologist who specialises in Brand Leadership, Digital, and Impression Management. Kylie can be contacted leadership.psychologist@gmail.com and +61 4 3248 5427.

A Wise Man does in the Beginning what a fool does in the End

Image

INTRODUCTION

Have you ever wondered why so many social & business problems keep getting worse even though we devote so much time, treasure, and human talent to their solution?  Have you ever wondered why so many people have dreams they never achieve?  Have you ever worried about why so many people have stopped dreaming?  Have you despaired that so many good people now feel it¹s impossible to improve the system? We have!

We already know that our attempts to solve specific problems have resulted in overly complex, disjointed, fragmented programs that focus so tightly on specific problems that they lose sight of the holistic needs of specific people in business, and their relationship to the larger society.

With such narrow vision, all our good intentions are doomed to failure.  All those separate programs compete for treasure and talent, too much of which must then be devoted to the needs of the “system,” and not the needs of the individual, and none of which can be devoted to solving needs outside the scope of the program, even if those needs are more urgent. Because of the competition for talent and treasure, the resources often run out too soon.  Then, all you can do, is apply band-aids, not effect a cure.

Complexity and Fragmentation is the disease in business exasperated by the 21st Century

In my opinion, the answer lies in a broader, holistic vision of human and business relationships and potentials. Such a vision makes it possible to conceive a system so much simpler that its very simplicity empowers individuals in business that flow on to the entire society.

as simple as necessary – no simpler’ Albert Einstein.

In the story that follows, we are presenting you with a great deal of what we have learned in managing high tech business and the organizational psychology of how people work best with other people.

Let me introduce the story of the ‘Wise CEO’ using a quote from Albert Einstein:

The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.

Now more than ever organisations have a need to move the higher levels of thinking enabling them to solve the ever increasing complexities of running a business in this global environment.

This allegory ‘The Wise CEO’ is a simple compilation of what many wise people have tought us and what we have learned ourselves.   – The One Minute Manager

We realize that the people working for the ‘Wise CEO’ look to you as one of their sources of wisdom.

I have lots of statistics to support the following ‘People are the business – but organisations only make use of 30% of their knowledge.

Holographic methods to solving global issues. Our holographic view of an business as simple as necessary no simpler.

In life cycle project management – A wise man is one who does in the beginning what a fool does in the end.

Good judgement come from experience – Experience comes from bad judgement.

Never lose a lesson learned.

THE VISION

Actually solve problems as simple as necessary no simpler

The inspiration comes from Albert Einstein;

“A human being is part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited by time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.  This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and the affection for a few persons nearest to us.  Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

In business the universe is the “One Company” we work for:

 Move the thinking back to the concept/feasibility

 The secrets

In the story that follows we present you with a great deal of wisdom – – –

 “Change is the law of life.  And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.” John F Kennedy.

RISK & UNCERTAINTY

Image

At the core of every business there is risk and uncertainty – the well being of the organization depends on how well these are managed.

The ‘Wise CEO’s’ aim is to achieving ‘self-regulation’ such that a holographic organisation can successfully manage ‘systemic/complexity/ & risk/uncertainty’ by enabling people to think simultaneously across a range of time-frames that achieve optimum performance.

However performance is about capturing business intelligence at all levels, from all sources, inside and outside the business at the right time before organizations can achieve remarkable performance.

The other side of the equation is about the people involved.  Our research found that learning to do something that people want to be able to do is an important element of making work really satisfying.  The ‘Wise CEO’ would not try to change the culture, but would evolve the culture in a direction toward collaborative learning thus increasing performance.  Risk and Uncertainty are equal and opposite forces within business and we have spent a lot of time to gain the wisdom how to manage uncertainty.

In this section we are not focused on risk governance, assessment, quantifying and aggregation or control, but we are about the time it takes to respond to changes that affect the business.  From this perspective the toughest challenge is to successfully building strategic internal partnerships that eliminate human factors such as:

  1. Risk = people, procedures, technology, infrastructure, organisation, hierarchy etc
  2. Uncertainty however is purely human and is the major driver in decision making.  Learning about uncertainty will assist the business with the evolution of a high performance work culture, and lower the incidents of stress in the work place.

To us a Learning Business is about achieving remarkable levels of performance, but also, about making it rewarding and satisfying for the people involved.

Language and its effects on business, culture and behavior

a)       Language as a part of learning is undeniable – so when we say “we know what we know better than we know what we don’t know”, we are being cute.  Each instance of the word “know” in this sentence has a slightly different meaning.

b)     The transfer of information absorbed by people/organisation is filtered through a distorting mesh of experiences, memories, prejudices, current preoccupations, pet theories, hobby-horses, needs, wants and aspirations.

The First Secret

Image

Every business has its own language and culture which is evolving constantly, the trick is to control this evolution by a process we call Business to Process Reporting (BPR).  A business language designed to prevent the importation of new terms, that are not understood, without proper authority or explanation and which can not be found by technology at the touch of a button.  BPR is a consistent language which is subject to logic, such that statements about what should be, are qualified, rather than asserted as absolutes.  BPR is developed using ‘proof’ concepts and high levels of objectivity.

People and the Business to Process Reporting (BPR)

BPR is a single process that implements ‘Integration and Performance Measurement’  It is the people technology framework that provides people with decisions information and move risk management into the concept/specification phase before the tender is placed for the design phase.  A tool to ensure the supply chain performs as required.  The ‘Wise CEO’ eliminates litigation resulting from knowledge gaps between the Contracts and Operations Group of Departments.

Standardization is a key benefit of the BPR process.  It makes visible areas within the plant and the control systems that lead to a modular design and results in clear functional specifications.   Standardization is also the key in reducing costs in maintaining overall compliance and Corporate Governance for the life of the project.  “BPR” is the corporate tool that allows people to ensure corporate risk management reporting for continuous disclosure are incorporated in specifications and reduce costs of ‘Integration Testing’.

The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them. Albert Einstein

BPR is part one of the Triple lens learning system able to move people to a higher level of thinking.

 The Second Secret

Image

To support people in managing corporate Knowledge (K) and overcoming their own unreliability; we developed a set of symbols that establish & maintain the relationships and connectivity between people, their technology and the corporation.  The symbols maximize ‘complexity/systems thinking’ to ensure a dynamic and appropriate set of connected communications is in place, making visible how all components work together for the life cycle.  It establishes systemic patterns and relationships between industrial and electronic age risk that can be standardized by people’ including ‘standardized software’.  This simplifies procedures and reduces training needs in risk mitigation for the life cycle.  In some industries K becomes ‘systemic K’ that most effectively focuses K into the concept phase such that the contract documentation makes the supply chain deliver a ’good health’ foundation for the operations phase.  The lens and the symbols implement ‘optimum performance measurement’ – overall dependability and its subsets of availability, reliability and serviceability, giving the power of K and communication to operations people such that they can use past/present K in combination with performance measurement to forestall the law of unintended consequences in the future with ‘remote’ support as and when required.

The Third Secret is described in Systems

SPACE

I believe it was the intent in the words of JFK:

“We live in an age of interdependence as well as independence – an age of internationalism as well as nationalism”.

The future of the West lies in a partnership – a system of cooperation, interdependence and harmony where peoples can jointly meet their burdens and opportunities throughout the world.

In the early 90’s my team recognized that by the 21st century, intellectual wealth would be the economic engine for prosperity.  We developed a new business model, a triple bottom line learning system (TBLL), which assists leaders to usher in an unparalleled era of collaborative advantage – beyond competition.  In short, economic strategic planning for a country, a company or business requires aggressive strategies to increase profit currently locked within intellectual capital.

We understand knowledge performance indicators and network structures, knowledge roles and skills, innovation and collaborative management technologies.  We have simple solutions that will assist CEO’s to mange risk and uncertainty simultaneously including the risks of managing change.  To us, an effective change management system is an essential component of a new business model.

 The ‘Wise CEO’ would plan to shorten the response time to expand and move into the space generated by changes that eventuate from our turbulent business environment.  Furthermore the Wise CEO would disturb existing market space to create space for the new products of the company.

PASSION

We are passionate about Actually solving problems as simple as necessary no simpler.

As many of you already know, economic is a function of knowledge; and innovation is how one puts knowledge into action and that any strategy must be international in scope.

But new strategies requires new KPI’s.

We are passionate about the evolution of a common language and shared vision that could transform the destructive competition (the ultimate form of competition being war) into the art of global collaboration.

The Wise CEO gathers that no one has developed really solid key performance indicators (KPI’s) in the area of connecting people with each other (or other aspects of knowledge sharing).  In the absence of these KPI’s we have done an excellent job of rationalizing why they aren’t necessary.  While we obviously have to be careful about the effort invested in the measurement space, KPIs are very important particularly when senior leadership is looking to lower Sales and General Administrative costs.  It is also very important in being able to determine if you are achieving the goals of your initiatives.

We can wave our hands at this all we like but identifying good solid measures of our success will never go away.

The KPI’s we are passionate about are;

The wisdom of our innovation in systems is the way of securing your future?

 What follows are bits and pieces we can use to move around.

STAR Series with Rony Dayan Knowledge Manager of the Isreali Air craft Factory

From: Kurt Rieger

Subject: KM & Change Management

 Hi Rony and all

Thank you for the kind reminder that my ‘techno’ language is not understandable at times.

You wrote:

‘The amount of white elephants representing unused systems within companies purchased by managers thinking they found an easy solution to a complex problem would be the pride of many zoos.

That’s the start of the complexity problem – managers in their “own isolation” justifying systems that in the end lead to knowledge silo.  Part of the problem is the ‘system’ of education – with the half-life cycle of a University degree ranging from 4 years to a matter of just a couple of month after graduation in itself leads to knowledge silos.

 Organisation by necessity has become the educator – learning paid for by the corporation – currently not retrievable?   The problems of these system goes even deeper – corporations having spent $300-500 million will persevere with systems that fail to provide expected gains- efficiency down – people grumble continuously – high stress in the workplace – more on this later

 Corporate judgments are affected by the rate of change in the external and internal business environment and many decision are made with only 20% of the necessary information.  Leading to management spending 80% of their time on making their decisions right – making an efficient change tracking ‘system’ essential.

You wrote:

‘Procedures are the way used around corporations to make them act as squads. The very raison d’etre of Hoshin Kanri, discussed in another message, is to enable the propagation of the CEO’s policy to each and every employee of the company. To state the demanded bottom line, and  to let it happen anyway anybody wants, is not to run the company.’

Yes procedures HAD a place – I have independently audited Corporate procedures for over 25 year – the way they are prepared (by convention) they are too rigid/inflexible/cumbersome – and in many cases are written by managers that have never been  ‘where the action takes place’ and as per human failing they fail to ‘pin accountability’ on anyone’s chest.  Thus you have the examples where management blames the shop-floor for failures – in many public cases the courts are ruling ‘systemic management failures’.  To me procedures, as they are now, have only one function – External  Auditors ‘must have procedures to audit compliance – be it Sarbanes-Oxley, QA, TQM, Six Sigma, OHSA and any Technical compliance issues.  However, in the case of safety procedures; organisation have lost out to the rate of change in the digital age and can not keep up with procedures (safety/risk/performance) that are practical and applicable.  Complexities of the digital age led to many instances where organisations can not keep up the rate of change in skills enabling people to write procedures.  – Standards are in a similar situation. (Standards for digital communications are still in the process of being prepared, I am on the local committee for IEC standards) Thus organisations contract out their procedures and thus their risk management obligations.  Could speedy change management of procedures be the key to a successful business? – I doubt it.  Procedures, because of their nature and intent also introduce problems of complexity that remain hidden in organizations.

This leads to informal management systems that overcome these problem at the place of action, at a specific time to suit a local environment (But is the solution safe?)  In my auditing experience I found procedures hide complex problems until too late – usually related to hi tech business solution introduced by managers – it is a circle of change that required high speed change & control management.   Bill Hall gave us some good examples.

Thus I would say that procedures as a basis of doing business are inappropriate for the digital age – the half-life of industrial age management is well and truly over.  Knowledge about Sarbanes-Oxley, QA, TQM, Six Sigma, OHSA and any Technical compliance issues are the starting benchmarks for a learning business – and it has to be as simple as necessary – no simpler.  Albert Einstein.
However, people call these ‘systems’ when in fact they are band aids on problems left over from the industrial age when acceleration of change started after the Word War II.

 You wrote:

‘Technologies will always be there to serve you, but they need to fit an environment of people culturally ready and with a set of rules by which ‘things are done around here’

Let me take this to the Board/CEO level of making business judgment – and ask these questions:

are there adequate procedures in place to communicate corporate business judgments?

Are business judgments passed to managers?

– Do managers use the above white elephants to implement them?

– Does this reinforce knowledge silos?

I would dare say that we are ‘thinking too narrow’ in dealing with learning.

You wrote:

‘If by systems you mean processes, workflows, procedures (and you probably don’t), then I fully agree with you, though by itself, it won’t be enough, and if you haven’t transmitted the culture, you won’t be going very far; if you mean technology (and you probably do), then I’m afraid this is what would be a waste of money (a challenge for a challenge).

Let my try and put a label on this one – in this way: ( Will it succeed? – let me know) – Risk  =  people, procedures, processes, technology, infrastructure, production performance, etc. (essentially everything in doing business) – Uncertainty however is purely human and affects culture.

If you place these on a neutral axis then risk is at the high and uncertainty is at the low end of the Y axis.

Explanation:

When we go into  business, risk is high – humans are relatively “unaware” of the complexity of risks within the business – thus uncertainty in humans is low – people are in their comfort zone,  Then events happen and people learn which raising their level of uncertainty – additional risk mitigation (learning about the risks) takes place to lower risk, peoples uncertainty is on the increase.  This cycle continues until  there is the as low as reasonably practical (ALARP) level of risk – humans uncertainty has reached its maximum – more events happen and decisions are made (back to the top of this page) These decisions (usually digital solutions) increase corporate complexity  – events happen in time and business becomes even more complex (we introduce more and more digital technology – which in this case are systems) thus the X  axis of this graph is systemic/complexity thinking in Time. (again we go back to the top of this page).

 Risk and Uncertainty are the equal and opposite forces within business and I have not read anything about the management of uncertainty? Stress in the workplace is becoming pandemic? Is that why the movement of CEO’s is on a 4 year cycle – it takes that long for them to reach their level of uncertainty?

 For example: I was given the task of establishing the reliability of power station plant – I took samples of data and analyzed this.  What I found raised my level of uncertainty such that I went to my boss and informed him of the ‘mess’  – I was told that statistical techniques would sort out the mess – I am no expert in statistical techniques – thus my level of uncertainly rose above the neutral axis and I departed from the organisation.

The challenge for a challenge is in lateral thinking – We developed a new business model that deals with risk/uncertainty & systemic complexity thinking simultaneously.  We asked ourselves – What will change the behavior of people in organisation and what means are necessary to realize this?

Humans accept that all of us are unreliable (in many instances this depends on how well we slept) and as management we must accept that –   thus we looked at assisting people in supporting them in overcoming their own ‘unreliability’ relative to their place of work – thus lowered their level of uncertainty for the benefit of the “organisation”.

The pressure of ‘performance’ also raises the level of uncertainty – Some of us are talking about high reliability organisations – in this digital age, this by itself fails to meet legal obligation for managing  risk.

Overall Dependability and its subset of availability, reliability and serviceability are on the corporate risk menu – including hard/soft and people ware.  Currently corporations are unable to deliver on software/people-ware reliability – this raises the uncertainty of certain people within organisations and in my extensive experience software upgrades are ongoing activities.

This demonstrates that organisation are learning – but are they learning ‘the right stuff’ – Corporations are unaware of the crisis of hidden knowledge explosions within organisation.  I have theory on why – and the solutions is in managing uncertainty – which has a corporate flow on into the future when long term decision making has to take place.  Thus the risk/uncertainty model has two application – internal and external and the external requires additional skill which are not taught at University.

That is why we developed a new business model, incorporating a new system of measurement, which ensures knowledge is recorded, categorized, quantified and then independently verified and validated such that learning outcomes improve business performance.  This may sound time consuming, however our business model makes this an on line function.  This is an essential component in managing uncertainty within a highly dependable organization.

This ensures new knowledge is dynamically transferable to the point of need or opportunity, thus ensuring a practical and high performance business; “as simple as possible – no simpler” Albert Einstein.

It is wonderful to see people’s ‘lights go on’ when they can find what they need, when they need it, understand it and turn it into action to help them to mitigate the risks delegated to them by management (in many instances procedures introduce errors confusion and frustration – I call this barrier in human connectivity/language). Gathering and using explicit/tacit K simultaneously  – which with practice becomes perfect. However, there is change and complacency needs to be managed.
Change is the law of life and those that only look to the past and present will miss the future JFK Everything in business has a learning component- but this is only of benefit .
when its timely.
Knowledge by necessity is always incomplete thus our new business model requires ownership/Equity in K which comes from within corporations – the local environment – local conditions and local people – it needs to support the CEO/BOARD/Chair of the Risk Management Committee in meeting their external reporting obligations.
This requires a method of collecting, correlation and retrieval from learning business to an organization capable of dealing with the knowledge economy.

Your wrote:
I’m not sure I follow you in the difference you make between a learning organization and a learning business, and in what way do you see it as being narrow. So maybe you would like to rephrase those questions, or maybe anybody else would know how to answer them.

If you want a learning organization you must first build a learning business – otherwise how would you know how to organize them – Thank you Rony – hope this throws some light on the system I am talking about dealing with Risk/uncertainty and systemic/complexity/time managed by people for the people which affect the health and well being of individuals and the ‘One Company’.

Acknowledgement – Colin Benjamin (Horizon Network Pty Ltd) for his work on
risk/uncertainty.
Knowledge Inc Editor Britton Manasco, and contributors: – Peter Senge, Richard Karash, Steve Davis, Tom Stewart, Joseph Pine II, Dorothy Leonard-Barton, Paul Strassman, Michael Schrage, William Brides

Cheers Kurt

SYSTEMS

Image

There are hundreds of examples where even the BEST CEO’s suffer from systemic management failures – and in many instances it is the pressure to respond or perform ‘on time’ which raises the level of uncertainty leading to bad experiences.

Just one Example: NASA Space Shuttle disasters

Time is the enemy in managing uncertainty.  the State of Knowing Cycle

is the disease which CEO’s need to solve.

The Wise CEO would design a systems to simplify complexity and reduce fragmentation to eliminate knowledge silos.  A systems that is the glue for the organization.

The Third Secret

Image

The third secret is the system design which glues secret one and two into the corporate culture


 

 

 

Digital Risk Management

risk reward

What keeps our work fresh?

Our minds.

We have superior intelligence with a combined collective IQ of 130, which is two standard deviations past average. Similar, all our business quotients are superior.

CQ Customer Value

How do you engage your customers?

How do you shape their buying behavior and hold their hand?

What are your career motivations?

What opportunities are you seeking?

EQ Emotional Security

How do you regulate your mood?

Have you considered how your mood affects others?

How do you keep the big picture in mind while you’re clouded?

Will they respect me in the morning? Everything you do affects others.

SQ Social Networks

How are your relationship skills?

When was the last time you laughed? Or did what you love doing?

Do you feel comfortable calling people for a chat?

OM Organizational Maturity

Socially, where do you feel at home?

How do you feel at work? Is it hard ..rk?

Do you know the game? The politics?

VQ Value Capital

What is your value capital worth?

Can we measure reputation? Brand equity?

How to put a $value on your market position?

SRQ Social Responsibility Governance

How do you see your opportunities for shareholder engagement?

What relationships if any, exist between your CQ Customer Value and your SRQ Social Responsibility Governance?

How bored do Boards need to get before they start asking questions?

About Us

The Wolf Pack Gurus use qualitative research to transform business into potential. The digital market, knowledge, and economies demands change; and those who fail to recognize this are doing it hard.

Our strong body of research has analyzed the past 50 years of technology, with costs that you/me/us meet for technology change that puts too far ahead of our crowd.

But our crowd likes it. It keeps you/me/us from thinking about our suffering, because what can we do anyway? How can we wake people up to SHARING?

We build bridges across generations; creating futures for Corporations stuck in outdated traditional thinking. Traditional thinking causes global financial crises. Stop crises. Stop thinking. We have to change our thinking, everyone. From the Prime minister down to the shop floor customer service; stop wasting time. Time is money. How costly is your time?

FAQ

In an organization of 140,000 people, all working an eight hour day, we have 1,120,000 hours of potential billable time every day. For rounding purposes if 140,000 could be billed @ $100 per hour then 1,120,000hours x $100 = $112,000,000 your potential daily income.

How much money does your 140,000 FTE make?

The average employee only does a productive 2-3hours @ 100%, the remainder of the time is procrastination, chats, toilet breaks, coffee breaks, cigarette breaks, mind wandering, and resettling.

Q Where does the fat settle in an organization?

A The fat settles in middle management, because they work the organizations politics to their advantage.

Q Will you be surprised to learn that middle management tends to only create a wheel for their existence?

A They do this being needed. Withholding information, sabotaging projects, gatekeeping threats and opportunities, etc.

Fact, eliminating two – three layers of middle management will increase profits by at least 2% per compounding week over the life of a six month transformation. Your project is handled entirely by Organizational and Corporate Psychologists, professionals who nurture your culture through potential building interventions aim at creating a phase-shift or wave-effect of change strategically throughout your organization, according our research diagnostics. We understand your symptoms; and this makes change feel like a gentle breeze because Psychologists know what we are doing.

Fact, Time management underpins everything for efficiency and effectiveness.

Imagine only 5 minutes. Now imagine 5 minutes per day per employee per day, per year @ 140,000FTE.A high potential organization making $112m per 8 hour day might see 5 minutes as potential $1.17m. Is throwing $70m per day away on procrastination, feasible?

Is Time Feasible? Time = money. Potential.

What we do

Our Wolf Pack Gurus show you how to play Time. Time is neither friend nor foe, but more precisely – time lost, is business waste. Time is expensive, $1.17m for 5 minutes. 5 minutes is performance.

And performance is pressure. Pressure in the digital age is pressure to change, pressure at home, and pressure at work. Boards, Government’s responsibility to society is about managing change commitment. Think bigger picture, less detail. Think beyond detail to opportunity.

Opportunity to turn lemons into lemonade; and digital risk mitigation, transformation of regulation into measured integrative potential.

Integrative potential is innovative; thinking outside the box.

Every detail is opportunity; and risk contingency.

Digital problem, risk contingency, risk mitigation; potential business opportunity.

VSQ

The Value of Shareholder Standards is a Benchmarking opportunity to engage shareholders as Assets. Assets we want to grow in value. Value of Shareholder Standards [VSQ] need to understood in terms of 5min=$1.17m; in terms of Social Responsibility to shareholders and society; and measuring corporate capacity.

What capacity is your business travelling at now?

What is needed to reach 100%?

And what are our potential returns?

On investment capital continuum 96x5min= $112m per day, times weeks, times months, times years; becomes crazy statistical reputation strippers. Therefore what is VSQ of potential, only mere fraction capacity?

Through bench-marking Director – Shareholder Standards into an Asset portfolio, we essentially empower every shareholder with ASX potentials.

Mission

WE want to develop a collective education and training campaign around ASX potentials that are potential productivity and bottom line; and how your Board is really travelling.

WE want to develop the thinking that Standards are Assets. Standards are bench-marks; and measurable.

WE think we can develop a $2 APP for shareholders in conjunction with your people. Empowering shareholder voice for a higher VSQ standards value; holding Boards accountable.

Imagine every ASX shareholder Standardizing Shareholder Value to a bench mark. This is ASX power to the people.

Mr Kurt Rieger has consulted with some of the worlds most experienced Energy and Petroleum Corporations; in operational and construction roles. Kurt enjoys mentoring people to ‘Get Their Life Back’; and passion for business. Kurt is a Corporate Wolf Pack Author, researcher, leadership consultant, speaker, and guru.  Kurt empowers Directors to think about Digital Risk in terms of opportunity.

Tradition talked dollars, we talk potential.

The Affect of Language on Business Digital Risk

Abstract

Organizations communicate goals and objectives through long paper trails that essentially build relationships between readers. Human capital can be energized through communication tools that engage outcomes. Policies, procedures, work instructions, forms, tenders, and contracts can become tools that get things done, rather than bureaucratic drudgery. Behaviorally, the psychology expressed in every document can help or hinder monitoring internal and external auditing compliance. This article discusses language effects as a contributing factor in self-induced complexity; producing unacceptable levels of personal and organizational risk. The main cause of catastrophic failures is Digital technology; and misunderstanding digital language affects overall business performance dependability. Proposed changes in measuring procedures make it possible to empower organizations to leapfrog digital bureaucracy. Dependability and business performance have high components of availability, reliability and serviceability. Research indicates a strong association between increasing feelings of security for process automations systems; and getting on with business. Our paper concludes intangibles such as; knowledge, transparency, truth, and trust only have real value when activated in human relationships. Currently moderated by enterprise architects; professional silos systemically fail to audit and resolve emerging conflicts proactively before they erode ‘common purpose’ in business success (Deloitte, Forbes, The Age) We found that individuals with high systemic competencies in managing digital risk and uncertainty, and who bring passion to their work, thrive in corporations with a common language. Common language adds organizational value through a top down, bottom up communication interface with rules of transparency interconnect. Common language is the cornerstone to understanding how passion energizes intangible relationship systems such as; brands, identity, learning, and the reality of making a system come alive. Governance transparency ignites passions to co-create, to action learn, to encourage network communities, to manage cyber security, through commerce, industry and common ground.

Much research has been published about modern business complexity. Directors and Chief Executive Officer’s fear complexity will only get worse unless we adequately manage digital business risk. Board and executive can manage the transition into digital risk management through consideration of the big picture. The big picture is that digital technologies are still controlling us; multi-media social networks use egocentric digital language; and knowledge economies are the new now.

Now more so than ever, transformational leaders need to use common language as the key element to encourage others. Engaging others enables peak experiences, continuous development, and enduring states of thinking. Enduring stress is disabling, however people who overcome such pressures generally learn from experience. Learning from experience is encouraged in a learning culture. A learning environment encourages people to ask questions. A learning culture encourages people to measure critical areas to avoid failure factors, and create learning experiences. Multiple measurements answer why, what, when, where, whom, and how questions quantitatively; creating a story of management performance, and modern business complexity.

Case Study

Recently we were asked to manage the political, social, and environmental impact of five large power discharges involving gases, ashes, and waters. Quantitatively the task started very simply, as data analysis of the performance of electrostatic precipitators that collect the ash particles from the exhaust gases for safe disposal.  Our data was extraordinary indicating areas that needed sorting out to structure the evidenced chaos. We learned;

  • The common language used to describe separate events quantitatively;
  • Fragmentation of data;
  • No compliance evidence for OHS procedures and instructions;
  • No communication plans;
  • Confusion in plant language terminology; and
  • Inability to measure time per event, situation or category.

Our main priority was to understand the common language for our digital management performance journey. Different languages exist between generations, such as Gen Y uses digital SMS language, while other generations prefer memos. We wondered which ‘language’ is really common language across the power station discharges, and how managers would cope with future language challenges.

Quantitatively

Measuring the availability, reliability, serviceability, and maintainability are still important in measuring robust plant and equipment of the industrial age.  In the digital age; these have become equipment under control (EUC). By some intangible management magic the EUC is now connected to digital elements. These digital elements are; programmable logic control (PLC), supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), and decentralized control system (DCS).  System elements such as software, hardware and people-ware also have availability, reliability, serviceability and maintainability.  We wanted to understand these separately and in big picture context. People-ware will be addressed under headings of complexity, management, and qualitative research. The quality of quantitative outcomes however is totally dependent on timed events, because these have multi disciplinary overlays that compound language complexity in relationship communication. Complexity generally has two levels, event categories of serviceability, and maintainability of differing contexts. Context management is therefore not well understood as the key element in organizational complexity, affecting enterprise data architecture design.

NOTE: As both light and shadow in an organization, language and time are Holon; and unforgiving to bad management.

  1. Management

The technology knowledge explosion held in automation systems and the World Wide Web added their  own terminology to the corporate lexicon, of which it is clear management, has not kept up. With adding more confusion to corporate communications, communications became complex. Another level of language needed to be structured into the corporate matrix to allow management to integrate understanding of vision, goals, and mission across another generation and professional boundaries. Generational misunderstandings can be interpreted through simplifying language complexity.

Complexities often spill across into people-ware, the organizations structure, policies, procedures, communications, and methods resulting in limiting flow on effects in the agility and flexibility in adapting to changes in technology. People’s competency in establishing business cultures that cope with regulatory environments with complete license to operate can be measured, and improved. Improving people performance, improves business and Quantitative Complexity Management. Therefore people-ware in operational settings simultaneously simplifies qualitative complexity management, across multi-disciplinary organizational boundaries; creating ripple contagion effects through commerce and industry. Industry issues need to be solved through solving people issues in mind with the quantitative element, without this measurement would be futile.

  1. Complexity

The authors use qualitative research tools from Industrial and Organizational Psychology, linking systems theory with the real world of business.  Business experimentation within the field is verified and validated through serviceability. As you may recall serviceability; availability, reliability and serviceability increases feelings of security for process automations systems, making it possible to empower organization to leapfrog digital bureaucracy, and getting on with business. Business performance is more than maintainable through using simplifying a common language.  Common language avoids compounded complexities associated with complex systemic-thinking. Therefore to manage risk and uncertainty, physical and emotional solutions simultaneously need addressing. Qualitative research addresses long term business sustainability, and achieving people-ware organizational maturity [OQ]. Organizations that are digitally empowered have transformed from the complexities of quantitative dependability, as shown in the diagram. Digital empowerment reduces the need for regulatory guidelines.

EQ
CQ
IQ
OQ
SQ

 

Unexpected outcomes in our qualitative research findings are the Emotional, Customer, Value and Social Networking Quotients for continuing improvements of business performance improvements.

Extensive experimentation has developed a Value in scientific Qualitative Research that answers;

a)    The purpose of a learning environment;

b)    Using best practice benchmarking to systematically answer questions;

c)    Collects supporting evidence;

d)    Produces independent research findings without bias; and

e)    Produces findings that exceed beyond the immediate boundaries of the study.

Qualitative research establishes a given research problem or topic from the perspectives of the organization. The organization of the qualitative research is determined horizontally in layers, vertically in business lines; defining values, beliefs, opinions, behaviors, linguistics, symbols, and social contexts.

Qualitative context focuses the evolution of business cultures from knowledge worker communities, within the organizational structure, processes and the physical, emotional, and cultural environment. The environmental conditions create dependency within the global market economy determined by the political, social, environmental rules of engagement. Clever designed structures, engage individuals to provide products and services which the business markets to society; creating a continuous feedback loop that is both open and closed simultaneously.  Simultaneously the environment is perceived as confusion and disaster in the making; or knowledge economies performing safety critical functions. Functional language has a profound effect on profitability. Profitability improves through clarifying, transparency, and openness to learn, leading to improved behavioral performance, efficiency through collaboration, and unified purpose.

We learned;

a)    How to define the organisational boundaries that enable measurement of qualitative outcomes for people-ware;

b)    Predefined policies, procedures, processes and controls in creating products and services are generally driven by regulations and their compliance obligation. Including expected performance criteria for measurement, based on consequences; (hence our passion for consequence management).  Internal and external auditing documents form the basis of our direct relationship to the final ‘outcomes’. (QA certifications and auditing of management systems for 11 industry groups was/is critical in this situation.);

c)    We collected evidence over thirty five years with SME (up to $200M) and multiple Corporate/Government projects ($1200M+);

d)    How management creates its own complexities are specifically not determined in advance findings, such as;

  • Writing Tenders/specifications/reference standard for an organizations dream project;
  • Engage Contractors/How to prepare back to back contracts/Commercial conditions for subcontractors;
  • Establish organizational structures;
  • Engage people in business;
  • Write policies and procedures – mostly written in general terms  and responsibility allocated to somebody and or the supply chain in case of high tech business solutions;
  • Flaws in communication; language, chain of commands, understanding & ownership, and technology in use;
  • Establishing relationships; organizational, commercial, business-personal related to trust; and
  • Establish quality assurance; the lack of assurance in digital risk mitigation.

e)    The development of change solutions were underpinned by the “Law of least effort” by Deepak Copra and ‘The seven spiritual laws of successes’.

  • The boundaries of our journey are open and ongoing.  However, we have established a ‘Systemic architectural model for business performance computing’ in a structured framework of a Meta-model. This framework includes a standard common language, adapted from the atomic power industry to manage digital risk and uncertainty simultaneously, Patent No.  AU2000PQ5207.

f)     Business leaders need to establish Meta-rules. These rules benchmark organization specific measurements, such as;

  • Within the existing constraints of policies, procedures, processes and controls,
  • Existing technology in use, which by the nature of its construction is unique. There are no two systems identical, requiring unique data management technologies;
  • With specific ownership and commitment to mange their internal and external risk reduction commitments, Set at the as low as reasonably practical (ALARP) level of risk for self-insurance purposes;
  • Improved/better decisions making information; and
  • Constantly changing global economies such that business leaders can rapidly adapt to change.

g)    Our hands on verification and validation of the model had to re-engineer business functionality, such as;

  • Increasing 7 principles of risk management to 12;
  • Upgrading the 3 law of robotics in line with current regulatory obligations;
  • Establish new overall dependability (availability, reliability, serviceability) frameworks (OHS Codes of Practice);
  • Prepare the benchmark standard IEC61508, for functional safety of electrical, electronic and programmable electronic safety related systems;
  • Establish principles of qualitative measurement dependability. As per ‘The Corporate Wolf Pack’ (from www.lulu.com; http://www.amazon.com);
  • High level strategic risk assessment, establishing risk mitigation priorities that fit digital/knowledge economies;
  • Focusing future risk, with a triple lens learning organization, through having change knowledge ‘from here to the future’ within accountability area of people-ware;
  • Overall strategic approach to the sum of changes ‘from here to the future’ enabling the Board of Directors to demonstrate organizational maturity through leadership; and
  • Empowering boards and executives with the tools to transform business sustainability quotients.

Unconsciously, through the lack of digital language awareness, disasters are hidden in organizations just waiting to happen. Awareness gained from gathering statistical data on digital data performance management, provides us areas of need where digital technology solutions may be applied. Interventions applied in this manner work as conscious development tool that provide clarity, transparency, and openness of goals and objectives. Aligning goals in this regard eliminate confusion associated with technology that penetrates hidden secrets that lead to hidden disasters.

 

 

Digital age Reference List

  1. IEC 61508 Functional Safety of electrical, electronic and programmable electronic safety related systems parts 1 though to 7 (Published as AS 61508 in Australia)
    1. NOTE: many of the listed standard reference come under the umbrella of this standard
  2. IEC 60300 Dependability Parts 1, 2, & 3 – Section 1 – 12 of part 3
  3. IEC 60300: 1984, Reliability and maintainability management
  4. IEC 60300-3-1: 1991, Dependability management – Part 3: Application guide – Section 1: Analysis techniques for dependability: Guide on methodology
  5. IEC 60300-3-2: 1993, Dependability management – Part 3: Application guide – Section 2: Collection of dependability data from the field
  6. IEC 60300-3-9, Dependability management – Part 3: Application guide – Section 9: Risk analysis of technological systems
  7. IEC 60319: 1978, Presentation of reliability data on electronic components or parts
  8. IEC 60362: 1971, Guide for collection of reliability, availability and maintainability data from field performance of electronic items
  9. IEC 60409: 1981, Guide for the inclusion of reliability clauses into specifications for components (or parts) for electronic equipment
  10. IEC 60414: 1973, Safety requirements for indicating and recording electrical measuring instruments and their accessories
  11. IEC 60513: 1994, Fundamental aspects of safety standards for medical electrical equipment
  12. IEC 61511 – Functional Safety – instrumented system for the process industry
  13. Draft IEC 61499 – Function Blocks for industrial Process measurement and control systems
  14. Draft IEC 61804 Ed.1 Part 1- Function Blocks For Process Control, Digital Communications, General Requirements 1999
  15. Draft IEC 60261 – Safety of Machinery – Functional Safety – Electrical, Electronic and Programmable Electronic Control Systems.
  16. AS 4024.1 2006 (Series) Safety of Machinery
  17. NASA Software Program  – NASA – GB 1740.13-96
  18. DOD-STD 2168 – Defense System Software Quality Program and the quality related provisions of DOD-STD 1679A (Navy) Software Development and DOD-STD 2167A Defense Systems Software Development.
  19. DEF – Ministry of Defense, UK
    1. DEF 00-55 – Requirements for safety related software in Defense equipment MOD 1997 Part 1 Requirements, Part 2 Guidance
    2. DEF 00-56 – Safety Management Requirements for Defense systems. MOD 1996 Part 1 Requirements, Part 2 Guidance
    3. DEF – 00-58 HAZOP studies on systems containing programmable electronics, MOD, 2000 Part 1 Requirements, Part 2 General applications guidance
  20. DEF (Aust) 5679 The Procurement of computer base Safety critical systems
  21. OHSA 29CFR 191.119 Process Safety Management
  22. ANSI/ISA S84.1 Application of Safety Instrumented Systems in the process industry
  23. ANSI/ISA S91.01 – 1995 identification of Emergency Shutdown systems and controls that are critical to maintaining safety in process industries
  24. TUV Prufing der Sicherheit und Fehlertoleranz elektronischer Steuerungen (Approval of Safety-aspects and Fault Tolerance of Electronic Systems) (8/2002)– Automatisieringstechnik 50 Ó Oldernburg Verlag
  25. Draft EN 746 – Industrial heat processing plants
    1. Part 1: General safety requirements of industrial heat processing plants
    2. Part 2: Safety requirements of furnaces and fuel supply systems
  26. AS 4360 Risk Management
  27. EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR 68  – Risk Management Program
  28. AS 2645 Information processing – documentation symbols and conventions for data, program and system flowcharts, program network charts and system resource charts
  29. AS/NZS ISO 9004:2000 Quality management systems – Guidelines for performance improvements
  30. AS/NZS ISO 9001:2008 Quality management systems – Requirements
  31. American Petroleum Institute API Spec Q1 7th Edition Specification for Quality Programs for the Petroleum, Petrochemical and Natural Gas Industry
  32. Building Control Commission – Essential Services Maintenance Manual – A guide to your building services requirements and listed standards.
  33. AS 4292 parts 1 to 5 – 1995 Rail Safety Management
  34. AS 4100 – Steel Structures
  35. Transport – Alternative Compliance – Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme – Business Rules
  36. Australian Standards and Conformance Infrastructure 1995 The governments response to the Report of the Committee of Inquiry into Australia’s Standards and Conformance Infrastructure – Linking Industry Globally.
  37. Value Management/ Value Engineering study1985, State Electricity Commission Vic, Plant Coding Systems (evaluation of coding systems from major suppliers of power generating plant from companies around the world)
  38. VGB Kraftwerktechnik Gmbh –Kraftwerk Kennzeichen System (KKS) (Power Station Identification system)
  39. Siemens – Plant Coding System
  40. Contract Documentation – my involvement was compliance management of the contracts and data is covered by confidentiality agreements for the following major works contracts:
    1. Power Station 2X500MW lignite coal fired power complex
    2. Oil Refinery – Maintenance Contract
    3. Coal Gasification Research Facility– ($100M)
    4. Mining Expansion Project
    5. New Zinc mining project, Mine and Port facilities – Build Own Operate Transfer (BOOT) Contract ($1200M)
    6. Power Station conversion – coal to gas Instrumentation contract ($100)
    7. For all of the above – documentation essential to my research

Contractual conditions

a)    Process and Instrumentation diagrams

b)    Lists Input/output signals

c)    Quality Assurance Requirements

d)    Procedures and instructions

e)    Applicable standards

f)     Level of compliance specified

Tender Documentation

  • Power Station – Instrument Upgrade ($50M)
  • Oil Refinery – Sulphur recovery units ($60M)
  • Gas Turbine Station Stage D ($80M)
  1. Company/Contract specific Standards such as: Esso, Mobil, Shell Oil refinery standards – Extensive list of proprietary standards that meet specific needs in the operations/maintenance phase for these companies.
  2. VGB Kraftwerktechnik Gmbh – Verlag Technisch-Wissenschaftlicher Schriften; Klinke Strasse.27-31 4300 Essen  – Begriffsbestimmungen in der Energiewirtschaft (Regulations in the Energy Sector) Teil 5 (part 5) Verfugbarkeit von Warmekraftwerken
  3. Regulatory Impact Statement for Transport (Rail Safety) Regulations 1998
  4. Stuart R Nunns – Functional Safety of Safety – Related Systems: the Influence of IEC 61508 and Development in Conformity Assessment Schemes on Business Drivers – Eutech Engineering Solutions Ltd, Belasis Hall Technology Park PO Box Billingham Teesside TS23 4 YS UK
  5. David Kiang- Technology Impact on Dependability Requirements – Convener, Joint Working Group IEC/TC65/WG10-ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7/WG9 Nortel Technology PO Box 3511 Station C Ottawa, Ontario Canada K1Y 4H7
  6. M Jones – The ESA Software Engineering Standards: Past, Present and Future – Ground Systems Engineering Department, European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) Darmstadt, Germany – 1082-3670/97 IEEE
  7. Victoria Stavridou (1997) Integration Standards For Critical Software Intensive Systems, Department of Computer Science, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS E-mail: victoria@dcs.qmw.ac.uk
  8. Victoria Stavridou Computer Related Standards and Safety – Workshop Proceedings 1082-3670/97 IEEE
  9. Ron Bell – Health and Safety Executive UK Chairman: IEC/SC65A/Working Group 10 -IEC ACOS Workshop V – Functional Safety within the IEC: Developments to date & the way ahead.
  10. Gerald W. Ash and Knowledge Management Luminaries, Fred Schoep formerly IBM, Jack Vinson Pharmacia soon Pfizer, Stephen Denning formerly World Bank, Will Hooper Xerox and others – Developing Quality systems in Knowledge Management – Paper presented at QSA Asia Pacific Forum October 2002
  11. Handbook of Industrial and Organisational Psychology – Morris D. Dunnette Editor – Wiley – Interscience – A general systems approach to organisations Pages 47-60, Motivational theory in Industrial & DDMIN      Page 5           3/27/2014
  12. Kathleen Day – staff writer Washington Post, After High-Profile Corporate Busts, Governance Consulting Booms 27/12/2002 Page E01
  13. Harvard Business Review on CHANGE – Harvard Business School Press Boston, MA 02163
  14. Victorian Occupational Health and Safety Act 1985 Code of Practice for Plant No 19 July 1995 Pages 12 – State of Knowledge, I/E 1508 Functional Safety – Safety Related systems on pages 20, 32, 54, and Design verifiers on Page 75.
  15. Tracey Swift (1997) QSA Professional Development Workshop, Learning through sharing workshop – “Integrated Systems Management and the Culture to support its effectiveness”. E-mail T.Swift@Sheffield.ac.uk
  16. David Parkin & Paul Bourke (2001) – Winning with Pumped Up People, Information Australia, 75 Flinders Lane, Melbourne Vic. 3000
  17. Institute of Chartered Accountants Australia – Vision 2020. Down-load from – www.icaa.com.au
  18. AS 3905.15 – 1998 Quality system guidelines – Guide to AS/NZS ISO 9001:1994 for the Accounting Profession.
  19. Quality Control Management in accounting practices Australian Society of CPA’s / The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia
  20. Extracts from ICAA Members’ Handbook

i.       N3 Guidance Notes – N3 – Risk Management Guidelines

ii.       AASB 1031 Materiality

iii.       AASB 1039 Concise Financial Reports

iv.       AASB 1034 Finical Report Presentation and Disclosures

v.       APS 1 Conformity with Accounting Standards and UIG Consensus Views

vi.       APS 1.1 Conformity with Auditing Standards

vii.       APS 2 Engagement Letters to Clients

viii.       APS 3 Compatibility of Australian Accounting Standards and International Accounting Standards

ix.       APS 4 Statement of Quality Control Standard

x.       APS 5 Quality Control Policies and Procedures

xi.       APS 6 Statement of Taxation Standards

xii.       APS 7 Statement of Insolvency Standards

xiii.       APS 8 Statement of Management Consulting

xiv.       APS 9 Statement on Compilation of Financial Reports

xv.       APS 10 Client Money and the Maintenance and Audit of a Members Trust Account

  1. J.E. Whiting – The Emerging Asia-Pacific and ISO Standards for OHS&E risk management systems, Quality Magazine Aug 1997
  2. Australian Securities and Investment Commission. Sections 295, 296, 297, 298, 299(1)(f), 344
  3. International Corporate Governance Network – Statement on Global Corporate Governance Principles, Adopted July 9 1999 at the Annual Conference in Frankfurt.
  4. K Rieger (1998) – Life cycle management of high technology projects involving Safety Related Systems; Published by: National Technical Committee on Safety Critical Systems, Computer Systems & Software Engineering Board, Australian Computer Society – November 1998
  5. K Rieger (1999)  – Software Safety Standards – How they affect business; Published by: International Energy and Engineering Conference – Monash University Gippsland – November 1999
  6. K Rieger (1999) – Quality in Project Management; Published by: The Quality Magazine / October 1999 Volume 8 Number 5
  7. K Rieger (2002) Avoid corporate failure-managing small elements to succeed – Published by the QSA Asia Pacific Forum
  8. Nahid Golafshani – Understanding Reliability and Validity in Qualitative Research- The Qualitative Report Volume 8 Number 4 December 2003 597-607 http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR84/golafshani.pdf

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  1. Don Edward Back, Christopher C. Cowan – Spiral Dynamics – Blackwell Publishing ISBN 1-4051-3356-2
  2. Yvonne Teoh Bource – The Secret of Life – Brolga Publishing ISBN 978-192 122 190-3
    www.yvonneteohbource.com
  3. Deepak Chopra – The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success – Amber-Allen Publishing & New world Library ISBN 1-878424-11-4
  4. David Cartney, Kurt Rieger – The Corporate Wolf Pack’ www.lulu.com
  5. Australian Institute of Company Directors – VicDirector issue 1 July 2010
  6. McKinsey & Co – The war for talent – www.seek.com
  7. Lysette Mavridis  – National Manager – Education Development – Australian Institute of Company Directors
  8. A T Kearney – The Characteristics of e-leaders – www.seek.com and related articles listed at this location
  9. Credentialing and defining the scope of clinical practice for medical practitioners in Victorian health services – a policy handbook.  Published by the Quality and Safety Branch, Rural and Regional Health and Aged Care Services, Victorian Government Department of Human Services, Melbourne, Victoria 2007,  © Copyright State of Victoria, Department of Human Services, 2007
  10. Health Services (Private Hospitals and Day Procedure Centers) Regulations 2002 S.R. No. 79/2002Version incorporating amendments as at 7 March 2008
  11. AS NZS 3551-2004 Technical management programs for medical devices
  12. The good Governance Standards www.opm.co.uk/ICGGPS/
  13. Corporate Duties Below Board Level Discussion Paper – Chartered Secretaries Australia www.CSAust.com
  14. Intraindustry Executive Succession, Competitive Dynamics, and Firm Performance: Through the knowledge transfer Lens. Journal of Managerial issues Vol XIX Number 3 FLL 2007: 340-3-6
  15. SEI Software Risk Evaluation (SRE) Service www.sei.cmu.eduonache,
  16. An Expert HR system for Aligning Organisational Culture and Strategy – Elizabeth F. Cabrera and Jaime Bonache, Dep. De Economia de la Empresa, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain
  17. Optimal knowledge transfer methods: a Generation X perspective. Depby McNichols Journal of knowledge management Vol 14 No 1 2010 pp 24-27 @ Emirad Group Publishing Limited, ISSN 1367-3270
  18. Dosing the Glue – Applying Human Resource Technology to the Build the global organisation Paul A.L. Evans
  19. The Theory of Everything and integral vision for Business, Politics, Science and Spirituality – Ken Wilber ISBN 1-57062-855-6
  20. IBM CEO study 2010 Capitalizing on Complexity – Insights from the Global Chief Executive Officer Study
  21. Infonomics survey March 2010 VicDirector – Australian Institute of Company Directors

 

Strategic Brand Marketing

Image

We speculate that Strategic Brand Marketing improves the customer experience through improving organizational performance. Improving organizational performance is a strategy for increasing business performance. Strategically, when we increase organizational and business performance through integrating generations; we in effect create a bridge over the generation gap. Bridging generations is authentic Strategic Brand Marketing. Most Brands target one specific generational demographic ignoring an entire market, that we propose to include. Take Telstra, for example; eliminating all generations except the Digital Generation in their Brand Market Strategy is costing big shareholder value.

Most people think of a product when they see a Brand (Monger, 2007). Branding is therefore a symbol of the entire organization’s marketing strategy. Market share, in black and white leads the organizations image, like a face in the crowd. The face that stands out in today’s crowd transforms market share into Brand equity, into Return On Investment [ROI], and creates a leading organizational Brand. Leading Brands therefore assume to have more brand equity and are more profitable, with larger market share. Market share increases with inter-generational integration for Brand awareness. Brand consciousness and Brand awareness therefore provide higher Brand equity, higher ROI, and higher market share. As sharing is caring, Strategic Brand Marketing achieves market status edge when organizational performance is high performing.

Organizational performance by definition is achieved through the total sum of organizations behavioral dynamics, and sense of belonging. Our sense of belonging runs deep within Individuals and is explained through in-group out-group Social Identity Theory (SIT). The social organization makes individuals feel like they belong to the organization through positive behavioral dynamics. Behavioral dynamics improve when the individuals identity is aligned with the organization’s identity; and this develops strong member-stakeholder belonging, symbolic of the total sum of shared corporate meaning. Shared meaning can be manipulated using Psychoanalysis to influence organization positive trickle-down. Trickle-down shapes meaning top-down and the shadow bottom-up through the organizations’ social networks, within and without; strengthening or weakening the Brand identity.

The organizations social networks support members’ sense of belonging and psychological connectedness, providing a social identity which influences Brand equity. Brand equity therefore increases through unconscious comparison with other Brands and organizations’ entirety. The organizations reputation develops through Brand equity and the organizations social identity actualizes Brand performance potential. Brand potential increases through opportunities to build Brand commitment.

The corporate Brand therefore as a product, not only provides social identification, and psychological connectedness for organizational members, but it provides shareholder Brand equity. When Brand equity elicits and enhances positive feelings associated with reputation, ROI actualizes performance potential through emotional feedback loops. 

Identity, Branding, and Age

Emotional feedback loops mediate Brand perceptions of the entirety of the organizations’ social environment and behavioral dynamics. The behavioral dynamics and social environment create experience, of which embeds the Brand experience emotion. Brand experience emotion translates psychological perceptions of structures, product, place and relationships into feelings associated with Brand identity. Strengthening Brand identities therefore, not only produces a transforming effect on an organization it increases Brand equity. Therefore conscious transformation of an entire organization is possible through manipulating Brand marketing and social identities. Social identities develop members and shareholders through shared sense of belonging to the organization, and to the Brand.

Brand belonging symbolizes the shared meaning total sum; which can manipulate the Brand identity through the social identity. The social identity can be manipulated through the organizations’ social networks. The social networks can be manipulated through positive emotional contagion. Positive emotional contagion improves organizations reputation, Brand equity and actualizes performance potential, increasing ROI.

Organizational belonging, reputation, potential, brand equity, and ROI improve through positive emotional feelings developed through the social identity. The social identity is empowered by organizational choice, Brand awareness. Brand awareness therefore mediates marketplace choice through generation demographic targeting.

Targeting only one specific generation, as previously argued; eliminates market capitalization. Increasing market capitalization through understanding generational functioning is strategic Brand marketing. Brand market strategy recognizes emotional and cognitive functioning between generations and integrates differences to increase market share. Research into emotional and social functioning understand that as we chronologically our motivational needs change. Our motivational needs change across the life-span. Socio-emotional Selectivity Theory argues an effect associated with perceived Time Left in Life influences our motivational needs..

The Time Left in Life effect influences a cognitive emotional intersection midlife determining our feelings of social belonging, and organizational connectedness. In simplistic terms younger people feel different about our social identity than older people, and therefore have different Brand awareness. Brand awareness can be understood therefore through socio-emotional motivational differences that explain how our social identity influences our emotional regulation. Emotional regulation associates Brand awareness as either enhancing our mood or providing food for thought.

Strategically inter-generational cognitive-emotional processing that considers Brand equity, and Market position creates a chronological ageing positivity effect that not only enhances mood, but challenges our thinking as to how we lived without it.

Understanding Cognitive-Emotional Processing through a Dual Psychological Process

Dual psychological processing has often been used in research to understand conscious and unconscious psychological processes that increase Brand equity. Brand equity is driven by emotional and cognitive processes. Cognitive process is logical, and subject to bias and prejudice; while emotional process is heuristic and spontaneous. Spontaneous elicits principle accuracy, and autonomous processing that leads to cognitive evaluation. In simplistic terms the emotional response elicited from Brand recognition shapes the perceived Brand equity.

To increase Brand equity, we simply increase our desired emotional response that will shape a particular way of thinking. To increase market share, we simply increase our desired emotional response that will bridge generational differences for a particular way of thinking. Inter-generational thinking therefore is the outcome we start with and work backwards, forwards to manipulate and enhance our Brand marketing strategically. The steps between are called interventions and are generally applied through Brand therapy, and Organizational Psychoanalysis.

Ms Kylie Prince is a Corporate Psychoanalyst who helps corporations, and investors build Brand equity through strategic Brand marketing. Kylie can be contacted by email princecuador@gmail.com or by phone +61 4 3248 5427.

Strategic Brand Marketing

Image

We speculate that Strategic Brand Marketing improves the customer experience through improving organizational performance. Improving organizational performance is a strategy for increasing business performance. Strategically, when we increase organizational and business performance through integrating generations; we in effect create a bridge over the generation gap. Bridging generations is authentic Strategic Brand Marketing. Most Brands target one specific generational demographic ignoring an entire market, that we propose to include. Take Telstra, for example; eliminating all generations except the Digital Generation in their Brand Market Strategy is costing big shareholder value.

Most people think of a product when they see a Brand (Monger, 2007). Branding is therefore a symbol of the entire organization’s marketing strategy. Market share, in black and white leads the organizations image, like a face in the crowd. The face that stands out in today’s crowd transforms market share into Brand equity, into Return On Investment [ROI], and creates a leading organizational Brand. Leading Brands therefore assume to have more brand equity and are more profitable, with larger market share. Market share increases with inter-generational integration for Brand awareness. Brand consciousness and Brand awareness therefore provide higher Brand equity, higher ROI, and higher market share. As sharing is caring, Strategic Brand Marketing achieves market status edge when organizational performance is high performing.

Organizational performance by definition is achieved through the total sum of organizations behavioral dynamics, and sense of belonging. Our sense of belonging runs deep within Individuals and is explained through in-group out-group Social Identity Theory (SIT). The social organization makes individuals feel like they belong to the organization through positive behavioral dynamics. Behavioral dynamics improve when the individuals identity is aligned with the organization’s identity; and this develops strong member-stakeholder belonging, symbolic of the total sum of shared corporate meaning. Shared meaning can be manipulated using Psychoanalysis to influence organization positive trickle-down. Trickle-down shapes meaning top-down and the shadow bottom-up through the organizations’ social networks, within and without; strengthening or weakening the Brand identity.

The organizations social networks support members’ sense of belonging and psychological connectedness, providing a social identity which influences Brand equity. Brand equity therefore increases through unconscious comparison with other Brands and organizations’ entirety. The organizations reputation develops through Brand equity and the organizations social identity actualizes Brand performance potential. Brand potential increases through opportunities to build Brand commitment.

The corporate Brand therefore as a product, not only provides social identification, and psychological connectedness for organizational members, but it provides shareholder Brand equity. When Brand equity elicits and enhances positive feelings associated with reputation, ROI actualizes performance potential through emotional feedback loops. 

Identity, Branding, and Age

Emotional feedback loops mediate Brand perceptions of the entirety of the organizations’ social environment and behavioral dynamics. The behavioral dynamics and social environment create experience, of which embeds the Brand experience emotion. Brand experience emotion translates psychological perceptions of structures, product, place and relationships into feelings associated with Brand identity. Strengthening Brand identities therefore, not only produces a transforming effect on an organization it increases Brand equity. Therefore conscious transformation of an entire organization is possible through manipulating Brand marketing and social identities. Social identities develop members and shareholders through shared sense of belonging to the organization, and to the Brand.

Brand belonging symbolizes the shared meaning total sum; which can manipulate the Brand identity through the social identity. The social identity can be manipulated through the organizations’ social networks. The social networks can be manipulated through positive emotional contagion. Positive emotional contagion improves organizations reputation, Brand equity and actualizes performance potential, increasing ROI.

Organizational belonging, reputation, potential, brand equity, and ROI improve through positive emotional feelings developed through the social identity. The social identity is empowered by organizational choice, Brand awareness. Brand awareness therefore mediates marketplace choice through generation demographic targeting.

Targeting only one specific generation, as previously argued; eliminates market capitalization. Increasing market capitalization through understanding generational functioning is strategic Brand marketing. Brand market strategy recognizes emotional and cognitive functioning between generations and integrates differences to increase market share. Research into emotional and social functioning understand that as we chronologically our motivational needs change. Our motivational needs change across the life-span. Socio-emotional Selectivity Theory argues an effect associated with perceived Time Left in Life influences our motivational needs..

The Time Left in Life effect influences a cognitive emotional intersection midlife determining our feelings of social belonging, and organizational connectedness. In simplistic terms younger people feel different about our social identity than older people, and therefore have different Brand awareness. Brand awareness can be understood therefore through socio-emotional motivational differences that explain how our social identity influences our emotional regulation. Emotional regulation associates Brand awareness as either enhancing our mood or providing food for thought.

Strategically inter-generational cognitive-emotional processing that considers Brand equity, and Market position creates a chronological ageing positivity effect that not only enhances mood, but challenges our thinking as to how we lived without it.

Understanding Cognitive-Emotional Processing through a Dual Psychological Process

Dual psychological processing has often been used in research to understand conscious and unconscious psychological processes that increase Brand equity. Brand equity is driven by emotional and cognitive processes. Cognitive process is logical, and subject to bias and prejudice; while emotional process is heuristic and spontaneous. Spontaneous elicits principle accuracy, and autonomous processing that leads to cognitive evaluation. In simplistic terms the emotional response elicited from Brand recognition shapes the perceived Brand equity.

To increase Brand equity, we simply increase our desired emotional response that will shape a particular way of thinking. To increase market share, we simply increase our desired emotional response that will bridge generational differences for a particular way of thinking. Inter-generational thinking therefore is the outcome we start with and work backwards, forwards to manipulate and enhance our Brand marketing strategically. The steps between are called interventions and are generally applied through Brand therapy, and Organizational Psychoanalysis.

Ms Kylie Prince is a Corporate Psychoanalyst who helps corporations, and investors build Brand equity through strategic Brand marketing. Kylie can be contacted by email princecuador@gmail.com or by phone +61 4 3248 5427.